Kerri, Author at KT's Personal Training - Page 2 of 20
Fat burning workouts for beginners

Fat burning workouts for beginners

When you are a beginner, finding the right fat burning workouts is incredibly important. Far too many times you see beginners doing the wrong workouts and exercises for months, then end up quitting all together because they are not seeing the results they desire.

What Fat Burning Workouts Can Beginners Do?

As a beginner, there is no reason for you to try and engage in all the crazy exercises and workouts you see at the gym. Most times, these individuals have no clue what they are doing. There is no reason to be spending 3 hours at the gym doing cardio or doing hundreds of sit ups and crunches for a leaner midsection.

Keep things simple!

Keep the exercises you do and workouts you perform as simple as possible. There is no need to overcomplicate your workouts when first starting out, this will only lead to injury and frustration.

How To Structure a Beginner Fat Burning Workout?

There are a few different ways that you should structure your workouts in order to see your desired results. Having a plan is very important, so be sure you never get to the gym without knowing exactly what you will be doing. Your plan should include:

  • Exercises you will be doing
  • Number of sets and reps
  • How long your rest periods will be
  • How long your workout will take
  • What style of workout you will perform

Knowing these five aspects of your workout is the perfect starting point. Let’s now take a look at that last bullet point: what style of workout you will perform.

There are three different style workouts all beginners should focus on when first starting:

  1. High Intensity Interval
  2. Circuits
  3. High Intensity Cardio

Below we will be covering all three…

Intervals For Beginners

Interval workouts involve doing an exercise for a short period of time, resting and repeating. For example, you would perform an exercise for 30 seconds, rest 30 seconds and repeat for 15 minutes in that fashion. As a beginner, some good starting interval times would be:

  • 10 seconds of work, 20 second rest
  • 15 seconds of work, 30 second rest
  • 20 seconds of work, 40 second rest
  • 30 seconds of work, 60 second rest
  • 45 seconds of work, 60-90 seconds rest

Depending on what type of exercises you are performing will determine which interval format will be right for you. A workout that involves weights or high intensity bodyweight exercises, you should choose intervals lasting 10-30 seconds whereas a workout done on a bike or treadmill, you can perform intervals of 30-45 seconds.

Circuit Training For Beginners

Circuit training involves moving from one exercise to the next with little or no rest, and completing all exercises prescribed before taking a rest period. For example, you would perform 10 push-ups, 10 bodyweight squats, 10 lunges, and 10 overhead presses with no rest in between. Once you finished those four exercises, you would rest and repeat.

Circuit training is designed to be very high intensity causing your body to burn tons of calories and fat. It also helps with muscular endurance and strength.

Beginners can choose anywhere from 2-6 exercises when performing a circuit workout. Depending on what you are working on that day, circuits can be upper body, lower body, or full body.

If you choose a full body circuit, it is best to go from a lower body exercise to an upper body exercise and repeat. On lower and upper body days, you should choose exercises that use antagonist muscles. This means choosing an exercise opposite of what you just worked. For example, after doing a chest exercise you should complete a back exercise as your next step in the circuit.

High Intensity Cardio For Beginners

The two workouts styles we just covered, intervals and circuit training, are considered a form of cardio. However, beginners often wonder what other “cardio” they should do when working out. As you already know, the long slow 45 minute jogs on the treadmill are not going to do the trick when trying to burn fat.

Therefore, if you want to do extra cardio, it needs to be high intensity. The best form of cardio is sprinting. The only problem is sprinting can be very difficult especially when first starting out. That is why it is recommended that you start doing your sprints on a bike or rowing machine first.

High intensity cardio is best done in interval fashion, as we went over above. For example, you could do 10 full speed sprints on the bike or rowing machine that last 10-30 seconds. You would then row or peddle slowly for 60-90 seconds and repeat 10 times.

Fat Burning Exercises For Beginners

As was mentioned earlier, you don’t need to do all these complicated workouts and exercises you see people doing at the gym. Always keep things simple. That said, below are 10 movements you should focus on when first starting out on your fitness journey:

  1. Push-Ups, Knee Push-Ups, Bench Push-Ups
  2. Dumbbell Overhead Press
  3. Banded Rows
  4. Banded Deadlifts
  5. Squats: Bodyweight Squats, Goblet Squats, Band Squats, Sumo Squats
  6. Split Lunges
  7. Step Ups: Bodyweight Step-Ups, Dumbbell Step-Ups
  8. Mountain Climbers, Cross Body Mountain Climbers
  9. Burpees (Modified)
  10. Kettlebell Swings (make sure someone teaches you the form!)

Fat Burning Workouts For Beginners

Interval Workout Examples:

Full-Body Workout: Interval 15 seconds on, 30 seconds rest for 4 rounds

Exercises: Push-Ups, Bodyweight Squats, Overhead Press, Step-Ups, Modified Burpees (or starjumps)

Knee Push-Ups: 15 seconds
Rest 30 seconds
Bodyweight Squats: 15 seconds
Rest 30 seconds
Overhead Press: 15 seconds
Rest 30 seconds
Step-Ups: 15 seconds
Rest 30 seconds
Burpees or starjumps: 15 seconds
Rest 30 seconds
Complete 4 rounds!

===

Upper Body Workout: Interval 15 seconds on, 30 seconds rest for 5 rounds

Exercises: Push-Ups, Band Rows, Overhead Press

Knee Push-Ups: 15 seconds
Rest 30 seconds
Band Row: 15 seconds each arm
Rest 30 seconds
Overhead Press: 15 seconds
Rest 30 seconds
Repeat 5 times!

===

Lower Body Workout: Interval 30 on, 60 seconds rest for 3 rounds

Exercises: Goblet Squats, Alternating Step-Ups, Sumo Squats, Split Lunges

Goblet Squat: 30 seconds
Rest 60 seconds
Alternating Step-Ups: 30 seconds
Rest 60 seconds
Sumo Squat: 30 seconds
Rest 60 seconds
Split Lunges: 30 seconds each leg
Rest 60 seconds
Repeat 3 times!

Circuit Training Workout Examples:

Full Body Circuit: Move from one exercise to the next with no rest. After all four exercises, rest 30-60 seconds and repeat 3-5 times!

Bodyweight Squats: 10 reps
Knee Push-Ups: 10 reps
Split Squat: 10 reps each leg
Mountain Climbers: 10 reps
Rest 30-60 seconds and repeat 3-5 times

===

Full Body Circuit: Move from one exercise to the next with no rest. Rest only where it says to rest.

Exercises: Goblet Squats, Bench Push-Ups, Kettlebell Swings, Overhead Press, Mountain Climbers

Goblet Squat: 12 reps
Bench Push-Ups: 12 reps
Kettlebell Swings: 15 reps
Overhead Press: 10 reps
Mountain Climbers: 30 reps (15 each leg)
Rest 60 seconds and repeat 3 times!

===

Upper Body Circuit: Move from one exercise to the next with no rest. Rest only where it says to rest.

Exercises: Push-Ups, Dumbbell Row, Push-Ups, Modified Burpees

Push-Ups: 12 reps
Dumbbell Row: 12 reps each arm
Push-Ups: 12 reps
Modified Burpees: 10 reps
Rest 60 seconds and repeat 4 times!

===

Lower Body Circuit: Move from one exercise to the next with no rest. Rest only where it says to rest.

Exercises: Dumbbell Step-Ups, Kettlebell Swings, Bodyweight Squats

Dumbbell Step-Ups: 12 reps each leg
Kettlebell Swings: 15 reps
Bodyweight Squats: 12 reps
Rest 60 seconds and repeat 5 times!

===

High Intensity Cardio Workout Example:

Exercise: Rowing Machine

Perform a 20 second sprint, row lightly for 60-90 seconds and repeat 5-10 times.

Row Sprint: 20 seconds
Row Lightly: 60-90 seconds
Repeat 5-10 times!

If you have any questions, just send me a message.

If you are interested in a program to increase your fitness, lose weight, increase muscle or improve any aspect of wellbeing such as mobility and flexibility, I can design a program specific to your needs via my Online Personal Coaching Program

Join me my on my Facebook page Fit 4 the Road as I keep fit and healthy while traveling this great country.

Is your body ready to get back to exercise

Is your body ready to get back to exercise

Spring is here and we all wanted to get in shape for summer. Combined with the lockdowns from our eventful year thus far, we are all keen to get back into some regular exercise or kick off a brand new routine! But there are a few things to consider before you rush back into it! IS YOUR BODY READY TO GO BACK TO IT If you have not done any exercise over the lockdown period or winter, you will need to review where your current exercise capacity is. Even if you have completed some at home workouts, your body might not spring back as you might expect once you decide to increase your intensity or get back to the gym. Make sure you start slow and get the right advice before jumping back into a more intense routine either at home or at the gym. We need to make sure we are exercising right for our current health and physical fitness because this may have changed significantly over winter and the lockdown period. By returning to a new or existing workout program too hard or too fast without a review of your current physical fitness status, some individuals may be placing their body at increase risk of serious injury which could be easily prevented with the right advice.  
YOUR FITNESS & STRENGTH LEVELS HAVE PROBABLY CHANGED For people that have done little to no exercise over winter and lockdown you will have experienced ‘detraining’ as a consequence. Research tells us that detraining can occur after just two weeks of not exercising in your usual manner with the same weights and intensity and affects your muscle strength, size and endurance. Detraining can lead to injuries if you attempt to jump back into your previous exercise routine after a period of no training or decrease in training load.  
GETTING THE RIGHT ADVICE CAN HELP If you have not been able to maintain your exercise over the Covid dramas and the colder months, your fitness level is likely to have changed, especially if you have previously been lifting weights. Need some advice on how to start working out again safety? Why not drop me a message or an email and we can discuss how we can gradually introduce exercises and intensity of workouts to reduce the risk of injury. Having a coach to guide you, ensure your routines are appropriate for your goals and offer moral support and guidance through weekly phone calls is what my Online Personal Coaching can offer you.
QL: The two letters that cause pain

QL: The two letters that cause pain

Are you ready for another anatomy lesson? It seems like I have had a bit of a theme going recently with pointing out parts of our bodies that cause us pain and how we can ‘fix’ it, so that we can live a more comfortable life and continue doing the things we enjoy doing.  

Traveling has been my thing now for some time and we have been holed up for quite some months getting over the latest challenges that have faced us all in recent months. But no doubt you are up and moving around the country (or at least your state!) as that travel bug takes hold again!  

BUT: Im addressing some of the aches and pains so that you are not only moving the travels along, but moving around well yourself! So, here we go!   The QUADRATUS LUMBORUM (QL) attaches the top, back half of your hip to your spine. You have one for the right and left sides. Its job is primarily two things:

  1. Bend your spine to the side.
  2. Hike your hip.

 If your QL is tight it opens the door for pains in the foot/ankle, knee, hip, low back, and even your shoulder because you have one side of your body tighter than the opposing side. You could waste a lot of time addressing what hurts and missing that the QL is the root cause.  

What Causes Tight Quadratus Lumborum?  

… It’s your posture!  Here are the main postures related to a tight Quadratus Lumborum:

  • Anterior pelvic tilt (your pelvis tilts forward)
  • Scoliosis (curvature of the spine)
  • Lateral pelvic tilt (one hip higher than the other)
  • Side lie sleeping position

  How to stretch Quadratus Lumborum? 

Hold each stretch for at least 2 minutes.

Make sure you can FEEL the stretch. If you can’t feel the Quadratus Lumborum stretch, then you are probably not stretching it!

You do NOT have to do all of the stretches. Pick ONE! …and do it well.

KNEE TO CHEST

Target: Lower Quadratus Lumborus

  • Lie on your back.
  • Bring your knees up and hug your knees towards your chest.
  • Be sure to keep your legs completely relaxed.(The arms should be doing all of the work.)
  • Gently hug your knees towards your chest.
CHILDS POSE

Target: Upper Quadratus Lumborus

  • Start in a crawling position.
  • Sit on your completely bent legs. (see above)
  • Bring your buttocks to the back of your ankles.
  • Aim to round your lower back as much as possible
  • Tuck your tail bone underneath you.
SIDE TILT (STANDING)

Target: Upper Quadratus Lumborus

  • Whilst standing, place your left hand on left hip.
  • Push your hip towards the right.
  • Whilst reaching over to the left with your right hand, tilt your torso to the left.
  • Aim to feel a stretch on the right side.
SIDE TILT (SITTING)

Target: Upper Quadratus Lumborus

      • Sit crossed leg on the floor.
      • Pin and maintain your right leg down.
      • Reach over to the left side with your right arm.
      • Feel the stretch on the right side.
      • Repeat on the other side.
WALL LEAN

Target: Upper Quadratus Lumborum

  • Place your right forearm onto the wall.
  • Position your legs away from the wall.
  • Lean the right side of your body onto the wall.
  • Aim to have the sideof your mid section completely in contact with the wall. (as opposed to just your hip)
  • Aim to feel a stretch on the side closer to the wall.
  • Repeat on other side.
SEXY POSE

Target: Upper Quadratus Lumborum

  • Lie down on your side.
  • Prop your upper body onto your forearm.
  • Whilst keeping your pelvis pinned to the ground, try to push your torso as up right as possible.
  • Aim to feel a stretch in the upper Quadratus Lumborum on the side closest to the floor.
  • Repeat on other side.
WALL STRETCH

Target: Upper/Lower Quadratus Lumborum

  • Assume the position above.
  • Whilst holding onto the door frame (or anything stable), let your upper arm take the weight of your body.
  • “Let your body hang”
  • Whilst anchoring your legs as shown, aim to bend your mid section as much as possible.
  • Use your body weight to sink into the stretch
  • Repeat on other side.
If you have any questions, just send me a message.

If you are interested in a program to increase your fitness, lose weight, increase muscle or improve any aspect of wellbeing such as mobility and flexibility, I can design a program specific to your needs via my Online Personal Coaching Program

Join me my on my Facebook page Fit 4 the Road as I keep fit and healthy while traveling this great country.

Strength training for runners (and walkers)

Strength training for runners (and walkers)

Do you love to run (or even walk for that matter). Do you run/walk for the freedom, the peace it offers you or maybe you love the social aspect of the 5km park runs or you might be even more serious than that, lets talks marathons, half marathons or enjoy your bush walking and hiking.

What ever your reasons or intensity of your workouts, weather you are training for a specific event or just use it as a recreational activity, when ever I bring up the concept of strength training and running/walking with some of my past and present clients I am met with some quizzical looks and responses like “What, Im supposed to do something other than running to achieve my goals”.

Strength training can have huge benefits for runners and walkers. Strong legs can deliver more power, while strengthening connective tissues (tendons and ligaments) can make you less prone to injury.

Improving your upper body strength can also boost your running and walking efficiency. Developing strength in your arms means you’ll improve your arm drive so you can inject more power into your stride.

With a stronger core, you’ll be able to maintain a stable upper body, minimize side-to-side movement and better hold your form when you start to get tired and fatigued at the end of a run or hike upper those beautiful mountains for that spectacular view (I write this as I imagine our up coming trip to the Flinders Ranges very soon!).

With a stronger core, you’ll be able to maintain a stable upper body, minimise side-to-side movement and better hold your form when you start to get tired and fatigued at the end of a run or hike upper those beautiful mountains for that spectacular view (I write this as I imagine our up coming trip to the Flinders Ranges very soon!).

Adding strength training to your routine even one or two times per week can also have the ‘traditional’ benefits for good health and long term well being by reducing all those nasty age related conditions such as osteoporosis, arthritis and loss of muscle. But remember as a runner/walker you are not training to bulk up muscle, but to gain strength. With that in mind your program will be a bit different to those traditional gym programs, focusing on compound (multiple muscle group) exercises and focusing on areas that may incur injuries.

How to build a program:

This program consists of 9 exercises (3 upper, 3 Lower and 3 Core). You have two options to build your own personalised workout.

Option 1: Focus on one area and make a mini-circuit of the three exercises.

Option 2: Choose 1 -3 moves from each area for a full body routine.

Each exercise can be performed with either bodyweight (beginners) or with weight added (advanced).

UPPER BODY

Pushup – remember to keep that core tight – targets chest and core. Perform 3 sets of 15 reps.

Bent over row – remember to hinge forward at the hips with knees slightly bent so that you protect the lower back- targets back and core. Perform 3 sets of 12 reps.

Reverse Fly – remember keep the back flat and engage the back muscles- targets the mid and upper back and rear shoulder. Perform 3 sets of 12 reps.

CORE

Plank– remember to place the hands directly under the shoulders. There are so many variations with a planks, so challenge yourself on this one! – Hold for 30-60 sec for 3 sets.

Leg Raises– engage your core, pushing your back into the mat. Perform 3 sets of 10 reps.

Side plank and thread the needle-make this move slow and controlled, engaging the whole body- Complete 10 reps per side for three sets.

UPPER BODY

Deadlift– Focus on hinging the hips, not squatting. Targets hamstrings, glutes, back and core. Perform 3 sets of 12 reps

Lunge– Complete all the reps on one leg first and gradually increase your weight. Targets quads, glutes and core. Complete 8-12 reps for 3 sets.

Single Leg Bridge– A great finisher for the glutes. Remember to keep those hips level. Perform 15 reps on each leg for 2 sets.

Make sure you increase your weights often (I suggest every two weeks), so that you are making progress and improving your strength. If you need help with a specific program or need different options due to injury don’t hesitate to get in touch.

If you do have any medical issues, I advice to see your doctor before you start any exercise program.

If you have any questions, just send me a message.

If you are interested in a program to increase your fitness, lose weight, increase muscle or improve any aspect of wellbeing such as mobility and flexibility, I can design a program specific to your needs via my Online Personal Coaching Program

Join me my on my Facebook page Fit 4 the Road as I keep fit and healthy while traveling this great country.

7 Benefits of Lifting Weights: building muscle is not one of them!

7 Benefits of Lifting Weights: building muscle is not one of them!

I hate to sound like a broken record, but it really is crucial to incorporate lifting weights into your workout regimen. In fact, when it comes to exercise for older adults, strength training actually trumps cardio because preserving muscle is more important than losing fat as you age.

Every decade, starting in your mid 30s, you lose a percentage of muscle, which affects your metabolism, balance, and ability to brace yourself in the event of an injury. By weight training, you build more muscle to protect your body against injury.

 

So, how often should you lift weights?

Ideally, two to three times a week—whether you lift free weights, use machines, or do body weight exercises.

Wondering which muscle groups to focus on? Reed says that depends on your goals. For a full body workout, “many trainers will tell clients to focus on the upper body one day and the lower body a couple days later,” she says. To help you get the most bang for your buck, consider folding in compound exercises and supersets into your routine, a form of strength training in which you move from one exercise to the next with no rest in between.

In addition to building strength, lifting weights has a host of benefits. Keep reading to learn all the reasons you should pick up a pair of dumbbells (or kettlebells, or dare we say, a barbell) today.

You’ll lose weight and burn more calories

While cardio can help you get rid of belly fat, lifting weights helps you build more muscle, which can also help you burn more calories. That’s because muscles are metabolically active, meaning they burn calories even when you’re not exercising.

When weight loss occurs in the absence of strength training, all facets of body composition are lost. You lose some weight in fat, some in muscle, and some in bone—and it’s unfavourable to lose weight that’s coming from both muscle and bone. That’s why strength training is so important.

You’ll protect your bones

As you age, your bones become more brittle and weaker. Lifting weights can help you build bone mineral density through Wolff’s Law, which states that bones can grow in response to forces that are placed upon it. In other words, creating pressure on your joints through weight-bearing exercises can actually help you build stronger, healthier bones.

Strength training involves muscles contracting against the bones they’re surrounding. This force applied to the bones helps improve bone density overtime.

You’ll manage stress and boost your mood

Just like any form of exercise, strength training can enhance your mood by releasing feel-good hormones called endorphins.

Recent research also suggests that exercise, including weight training, may help protect against Alzheimer’s and dementia.

You’ll improve your posture

If you have a desk job, chances are you’re dealing with a case of rounded shoulders and a hunched back, which places additional pressure on your low back. This can lead to bad posture and limited range of motion in the shoulders, which are the most flexible joint in the body.

But lifting weights can help reverse this by opening up the chest, strengthening the back muscles, and improving freedom of movement. It also strengthens your core, which keeps the back in alignment and upright.

Go for multi-joint compound exercises (think a squat to overhead press or a lateral lunge to twist), which can help you work in different planes of motion and muscle groups, saving you time and effort.

You’ll reduce back pain

There’s no one reason for back pain, but muscular imbalances, like weak knees and an unstable core, can contribute, among other things. Most people think aches and pain are due to strains, but sometimes, it’s a result of bad biomechanics. Your muscles work in a kinetic chain, so if there’s a weak link, it can often manifest into a bigger problem in different areas of the body. But by building total-body strength, you can bypass most injuries.

For example, if you have weak hip flexors, it also means you have weak glutes—their opposing muscles. Typically the muscles don’t weaken evenly, so this can also throw your pelvis out of whack, which could affect your gait. As weak and tight muscles tug and pull, they can cause imbalances and pain, which is your body telling you that something is wrong.”

You’ll improve memory and brain health

Physical activity can help prevent or delay cognitive decline in people over 50, regardless of their current neurological state.

When you’re moving, your body pumps oxygen-rich blood to your brain, boosting your brain’s ability to create new neural connections and adjust to changes in environment. By improving these connections, you can better handle stressful situations that come with life and stay sharp.

You’ll be better in tune with your body

There’s nothing like lifting a pair of weights to help you tune into your senses when you work out. Whether you’re doing an overhead press, a plank row, or a goblet squat, lifting weights creates greater awareness around using your breath to help you get the most out of each rep. Plus, doing complex moves can test your listening and cognitive skills—it takes some brain power to process a trainer’s cues and execute a move properly!

If you have any questions, just send me a message.

If you are interested in a program to increase your fitness, lose weight, increase muscle or improve any aspect of wellbeing such as mobility and flexibility, I can design a program specific to your needs via my Online Personal Coaching Program

Join me my on my Facebook page Fit 4 the Road as I keep fit and healthy while traveling this great country.